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Dry Skin and Eczema

Dry Skin (Eczema)

What is eczema?

Eczema (also known as atopic dermatitis) is an allergic skin condition that affects young and old alike. It is itchy, thickened, scarlet areas on an assortment of parts of the body. White blood cells from patients with eczema show decreased levels of prostaglandins, increased histamine release, and decreased ability to kill bacteria. A similar condition is psoriasis. Psoriasis is marked by plaques and silvery scales on the skin, caused by too rapid replication and pile up of skin cells. The lesions can weep fluids and may form small blisters.

What causes eczema?

Medical professionals think that eczema is often caused by a combination of heredity and enviornmental factors. There are several factors that may cause eczema to flare up or get worse, including:

stress
food allergies
seasonal allergies
• irritants (like cleaning solutions or soaps)

• overuse of pharmeceutical drugs or antibiotics
• sensitivity to candida yeast 
• hormonal changes

 

 

 

 

 


"References"

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