Oolong Tea - Loose (Wu Long Cha) 1 lb Enjoy a health benefiting cup of herbal tea.
Starwest Botanicals

Oolong Tea (Wu Long Cha) Loose Leaf 1 lb. - Starwest Botanicals Brand

$23.75

Herbal Information for Oolong Tea in Loose Leaf Form

Name: Oolong Tea, Wu Long Cha

Botanical Name: Camellia sinensis

Other Ingredients: None, nothing has been added to this product.

Package Size: One Pound (1lb)

Form: Loose Leaf Tea

Dosage: Consult your healthcare professional for correct dosage.

Origin: China

Brand: Starwest Botanicals

Cautions: This tea contains caffeine

California Prop 65 

Brewing Suggestions

  1. Pour 6 oz of simmering water (170-180° F preferred) over 1 tsp. of tea.
  2. Steep 2-4 minutes, strain, and serve.

About Oolong Tea

Partially oxidized tea yielding a mild aromatic flavor between that of black and green tea, Oolong tea is commonly served as the house tea in chinese restaurants in the US.

Combining elements of green and black tea processes, Oolong tea is semi-fermented. The processing of this tea keeps moisture within the leaves for a longer period of time than the green tea leaves. After wilting, the usually larger, older leaves are carefully rolled around on rattan trays in order to "bruise" their outer edge. The black outer and green inner parts of the leaf give this tea its characteristic qualities. The flavor is usually a light brown and can sometimes reveal a slight fruity taste. Quality Oolong teas have been brewed up to 10 times but produce a full body taste and aroma.

Oolong teas almost have no trace of bitterness and generally have a stronger aroma than almost any black or green tea. Like dark chocolate, oolong tea is rich in antioxidants known as polyphenols, which are good for cardiovascular health and an overall sense of well being. Oolongs are prized teas sought out for their unique character. Oolong teas are made by allowing the leaves to partially oxidize before and during drying. The flavor and aroma of tea varies with soil, climate, method of drying and storage, much as wine grapes vary. 

Oolong teas, also known as Wu Long are higher than green tea in caffeine and contain among the highest concentration of antioxidant polyphenols. Oolong teas should be steeped in 185 degree (F - 85 degree C) water for two minutes. Oolong teas are second in caffeine potency next to black teas. They're darker than green and white teas but lighter than black teas. Oolong teas are made from larger, more mature leaves and buds. These tougher leaves oxidize more slowly allowing the tea crafter to carefully monitor the level and rate of oxidation, bringing the process to a halt at that exact point on the tea spectrum that defines his or her intended tea.

Oolong teas are distinct in that they are semi-fermented (or partially oxidized) to give a tea with characteristics between that of a green tea and a black tea and having a fresh yet sophisticated taste. They are smoother than black tea yet less grassy than green teas.  Oolong teas are mainly produced in mainland China and Taiwan . The Darjeeling region of India is now producing some very fine oolongs.

Oolong teas are bruised to begin the fermentation process and then fashioned into a ball using a cloth sack. They are shaken or tumbled regularly during the fermentation process and checked regularly so that they are allowed to ferment just the right amount of time. One of the more popular and famous of the Oolong teas is T'ieh Kuan-yin, known as Iron Buddha.5 Oolong teas are an appealing choice for tea drinkers looking for a tea not quite as strong as a black tea but less vegetal in taste than a green tea.

Looking for some brewing tips? Here's our step by step guide!

How to Brew a Flawless Cup of Tea
Have you been brewing tea for years but can't seem to find just the right way to brew? Or maybe you are new to teas and infusions and want some guidance. Either way, you've come to the right place! Try our easy, fool-proof method on how to brew a flawless cup of tea!

Step 1: Get your tea and cold water prepared.
Your tea might already come in teabags. If you have bulk herbs or loose leaf tea (like in the second picture), you will need a tea ball strainer or reusable tea bag to put the leaves into for straining. The amount of water should reflect how much tea you want to drink, plus a little extra. If you make too much, you can always store the rest in the fridge for some iced tea later.

 

Step 1: Get your tea and cold water prepared.

 Step 2: Preheat your teapot.
Boil enough water to fill your teapot one and one half times. Pour the hot water into the teapot and swish it around in order to heat the teapot up. Once the teapot is pre-heated, pour out the used water. Many people do not do this, but without doing this step, your tea becomes lukewarm quickly. This will keep your tea hotter for much longer.

Step 2: Preheat your teapot.

 Step 3: Measure out your tea.
Measure one teaspoon (1 tsp.) of loose tea for every cup you plan to pour, plus one for the pot. Trust me on this... it will make a difference! To brew a stronger tea, add a few extra teaspoons.

 

Step 3: Measure out your tea.Step 4: Boil the water.
For black teas, bring the water to a full boil. Remove the tea kettle from the heat as soon as the water begins to boil. Boiling all the oxygen out of the water will flatten the tea's flavor. For more delicate green teas, remove the tea kettle from the heat before the water begins boiling, at 165-170 degrees F (74-77 degrees C). You can also add one part cold water to four parts boiling water to cool it to the ideal temperature range.

Step 4: Boil the water.

Step 5: Pour a small amount of hot water on the tea leaves.
Before steeping, pour a small amount of the hot water over the tea leaves to allow them to bloom (open up) and release some of their bitter tannins. Drain immediately.

Step 6: Fill the teapot with boiling water.
With your tea already in your teapot, fill the teapot with the boiling water. Keep the spout of the kettle close to the teapot while you pour so the water does not cool as you pour it in. Cover the teapot and leave the tea to brew. See our tea brewing times chart below for the best times for your type of tea.

Step 6: Fill the teapot with boiling water.

Step 7: Pour yourself a cup of tea.
When the tea is done steeping, pour yourself a cup. Avoid keeping the leaves in contact with the hot water as over-brewed tea will become bitter and unpleasant.

Step 7: Pour yourself a cup of tea.

 

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  • Description

    Herbal Information for Oolong Tea in Loose Leaf Form

    Name: Oolong Tea, Wu Long Cha

    Botanical Name: Camellia sinensis

    Other Ingredients: None, nothing has been added to this product.

    Package Size: One Pound (1lb)

    Form: Loose Leaf Tea

    Dosage: Consult your healthcare professional for correct dosage.

    Origin: China

    Brand: Starwest Botanicals

    Cautions: This tea contains caffeine

    California Prop 65 

    Brewing Suggestions

    1. Pour 6 oz of simmering water (170-180° F preferred) over 1 tsp. of tea.
    2. Steep 2-4 minutes, strain, and serve.

    About Oolong Tea

    Partially oxidized tea yielding a mild aromatic flavor between that of black and green tea, Oolong tea is commonly served as the house tea in chinese restaurants in the US.

    Combining elements of green and black tea processes, Oolong tea is semi-fermented. The processing of this tea keeps moisture within the leaves for a longer period of time than the green tea leaves. After wilting, the usually larger, older leaves are carefully rolled around on rattan trays in order to "bruise" their outer edge. The black outer and green inner parts of the leaf give this tea its characteristic qualities. The flavor is usually a light brown and can sometimes reveal a slight fruity taste. Quality Oolong teas have been brewed up to 10 times but produce a full body taste and aroma.

    Oolong teas almost have no trace of bitterness and generally have a stronger aroma than almost any black or green tea. Like dark chocolate, oolong tea is rich in antioxidants known as polyphenols, which are good for cardiovascular health and an overall sense of well being. Oolongs are prized teas sought out for their unique character. Oolong teas are made by allowing the leaves to partially oxidize before and during drying. The flavor and aroma of tea varies with soil, climate, method of drying and storage, much as wine grapes vary. 

    Oolong teas, also known as Wu Long are higher than green tea in caffeine and contain among the highest concentration of antioxidant polyphenols. Oolong teas should be steeped in 185 degree (F - 85 degree C) water for two minutes. Oolong teas are second in caffeine potency next to black teas. They're darker than green and white teas but lighter than black teas. Oolong teas are made from larger, more mature leaves and buds. These tougher leaves oxidize more slowly allowing the tea crafter to carefully monitor the level and rate of oxidation, bringing the process to a halt at that exact point on the tea spectrum that defines his or her intended tea.

    Oolong teas are distinct in that they are semi-fermented (or partially oxidized) to give a tea with characteristics between that of a green tea and a black tea and having a fresh yet sophisticated taste. They are smoother than black tea yet less grassy than green teas.  Oolong teas are mainly produced in mainland China and Taiwan . The Darjeeling region of India is now producing some very fine oolongs.

    Oolong teas are bruised to begin the fermentation process and then fashioned into a ball using a cloth sack. They are shaken or tumbled regularly during the fermentation process and checked regularly so that they are allowed to ferment just the right amount of time. One of the more popular and famous of the Oolong teas is T'ieh Kuan-yin, known as Iron Buddha.5 Oolong teas are an appealing choice for tea drinkers looking for a tea not quite as strong as a black tea but less vegetal in taste than a green tea.

    Looking for some brewing tips? Here's our step by step guide!

    How to Brew a Flawless Cup of Tea
    Have you been brewing tea for years but can't seem to find just the right way to brew? Or maybe you are new to teas and infusions and want some guidance. Either way, you've come to the right place! Try our easy, fool-proof method on how to brew a flawless cup of tea!

    Step 1: Get your tea and cold water prepared.
    Your tea might already come in teabags. If you have bulk herbs or loose leaf tea (like in the second picture), you will need a tea ball strainer or reusable tea bag to put the leaves into for straining. The amount of water should reflect how much tea you want to drink, plus a little extra. If you make too much, you can always store the rest in the fridge for some iced tea later.

     

    Step 1: Get your tea and cold water prepared.

     Step 2: Preheat your teapot.
    Boil enough water to fill your teapot one and one half times. Pour the hot water into the teapot and swish it around in order to heat the teapot up. Once the teapot is pre-heated, pour out the used water. Many people do not do this, but without doing this step, your tea becomes lukewarm quickly. This will keep your tea hotter for much longer.

    Step 2: Preheat your teapot.

     Step 3: Measure out your tea.
    Measure one teaspoon (1 tsp.) of loose tea for every cup you plan to pour, plus one for the pot. Trust me on this... it will make a difference! To brew a stronger tea, add a few extra teaspoons.

     

    Step 3: Measure out your tea.Step 4: Boil the water.
    For black teas, bring the water to a full boil. Remove the tea kettle from the heat as soon as the water begins to boil. Boiling all the oxygen out of the water will flatten the tea's flavor. For more delicate green teas, remove the tea kettle from the heat before the water begins boiling, at 165-170 degrees F (74-77 degrees C). You can also add one part cold water to four parts boiling water to cool it to the ideal temperature range.

    Step 4: Boil the water.

    Step 5: Pour a small amount of hot water on the tea leaves.
    Before steeping, pour a small amount of the hot water over the tea leaves to allow them to bloom (open up) and release some of their bitter tannins. Drain immediately.

    Step 6: Fill the teapot with boiling water.
    With your tea already in your teapot, fill the teapot with the boiling water. Keep the spout of the kettle close to the teapot while you pour so the water does not cool as you pour it in. Cover the teapot and leave the tea to brew. See our tea brewing times chart below for the best times for your type of tea.

    Step 6: Fill the teapot with boiling water.

    Step 7: Pour yourself a cup of tea.
    When the tea is done steeping, pour yourself a cup. Avoid keeping the leaves in contact with the hot water as over-brewed tea will become bitter and unpleasant.

    Step 7: Pour yourself a cup of tea.

     

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    Current Stock:
    SKU: 401065-01
    Global Trade Item Number: 767963032287
    Manufacturer Part Number 401065-01
    Condition: New
    Availability: Usually ships in 1 business day
    Width: 3.00 (in)
    Height: 5.00 (in)
    Depth: 5.00 (in)